Claudia Ravaschiere & Mike Moss
Claudia Ravaschiere & Mike Moss

Translucent and reflective dichroic film casts changing patterns on the sidewalk.

Claudia Ravaschiere & Mike Moss
Claudia Ravaschiere & Mike Moss

The appearance of the shelter changes depending on your vantage point and the time of day.

Claudia Ravaschiere & Mike Moss
Claudia Ravaschiere & Mike Moss

Placing the dichroic film required exact measurement and placement as well as careful handling.

Claudia Ravaschiere & Mike Moss
Claudia Ravaschiere & Mike Moss

Installation process.

Claudia Ravaschiere & Mike Moss
Claudia Ravaschiere & Mike Moss

Installation process.

Claudia Ravaschiere & Mike Moss
Claudia Ravaschiere & Mike Moss

Fields of bright yellow and purple colors were cast by mid-day sun.

Claudia Ravaschiere & Mike Moss
Claudia Ravaschiere & Mike Moss

Artist Claudia Ravaschiere with a prototype dichroic umbrella that Cecily Miller found on the internet.

Claudia Ravaschiere & Mike Moss
Claudia Ravaschiere & Mike Moss

Waiting for the bus becomes a magical experience in this shelter.

#ARTBRT: Claudia Ravaschiere & Mike Moss

Ravaschiere and Moss are known for their experiments with new materials and their interest in harnessing light. Many of their public art pieces play with patterns of color and shadow.  For the ARTBRT project, they researched a number of translucent and reflect films and selected dichroic film, using it for the first time.  We were particularly delighted to support an experimental piece; no one knew quite how it would look once installed.

 

The result was truly magical.  The interplay between color, transparency and reflection of the surroundings created complex patterns and overlaid images.  The bus shelter combined effects comparable to fun house mirrors, vivid theatrical gels, street photography, and stained glass. The effects shifted with time of day and the quality of light; also, our own movement and perspective transformed what we would see, encouraging active, playful interaction. Maybe this is what it would be like to wait for the bus in a soap bubble?

Cecily worked with Arlington Public Art to curate temporary installations in 5 bus shelters as part of the Town's BRT (Bus Rapid Transit) Pilot Project.  The BRT Pilot experimented with ways to improve public transportation – specifically the morning commute on buses that run along Mass Avenue.  Art installations supported this effort by landmarking bus shelters and creating a buzz. Each shelter design was unique, reflecting the style and interests of each artist; several of the artists also executed coordinated elements along Mass Ave. Shared themes included protecting the environment, connecting with neighbors, and enlivening the experience of waiting for the bus. The art successfully celebrated the Town’s initiative to improve bus service so residents can leave their cars at home.